Service learning Faculty Fellows

Contact

Dr. Kaveh Abhari
Department of Management Information Systems
SDSU Fowler College of Business

Office: SSE 3200
p. 619-594-0746
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
http://abhari.info/ 

Headshot of Kaveh AbhariOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
I am committed to helping students develop capacities, competencies, and the confidence to take responsibility in their personal and professional lives and stand out in their community as a positive catalyst for change. I attempt to achieve this goal by (a) helping students systematically find and critically analyze the connections between theory, practice, and impact without limiting their creativity; (b) providing experiential service learning opportunities beyond classroom boundaries to solve real-world problems; and (c) offering students the opportunity to learn autonomously while helping them choose wisely what, how, when, and from whom to learn.

Education and Training
2014, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Ph.D., Communication & Information Sciences 

Service Learning Courses Taught
N/A

Publications and Presentations related to Services Learning
N/A

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
N/A

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
Senior Advisor, Bizgenics Foundation

Contact

Professor Carlos Castro
School of Art + Design
SDSU College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

Office: ARTN 504A
p. 619-594-6511 
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
www.carloscastroarias.com 

Headshot of Carlos CastroOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
My teaching philosophy is grounded in providing real-world experiences for students, guiding them to be creative in aspects of life beyond the classroom, and encouraging self-knowledge. To achieve these goals, I provide a methodology for students to create and exhibit their artwork, to engage in community projects, and to learn basic techniques of meditation. 

Education and Training
2010. San Francisco Art Institute USA MFA 
2002. Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano Colombia BFA

Service Learning Courses Taught
I am interested in creating avenues for students to interact with other cultural environments and artists. Therefore, in collaboration with Professor Martha Cíntora of the University of Baja California (UABC), I developed a new binational course called Blurring Borders, which is offered jointly by SDSU and UABC in Tijuana. In this course, taught for the first time in Fall 2019, students experience the art scene of both sides of the border by visiting museums, independent spaces, artists’ studios, and other visual art venues. The students from both universities also will collaborate by creating a mural at the Build a Miracle Foundation, a community center in Tijuana, and by presenting an exhibition in San Diego at The Front art and culture gallery. 

Publications and Presentations related to Services Learning
N.A.

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
N.A.

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
One aspect of my teaching method is to assign projects that require students to make collaborative works conceived for specific places. Such projects stimulate investigative research and community dialogue. Students successfully have completed murals at three locations: Donovan State Prison in Otay Mesa (2019); School of Art and Design, SDSU (2017, in conjunction with Professor Eva Struble and her students); Love Library, SDSU (2015). For SDSU’s 2016 Common Experience initiative, my students worked with School staff members to create The Wave, an interactive sculpture and skateboard ramp that attracted skateboarders from across campus. In 2015, my students made paintings that functioned as stage sets for Professor Peter Cirino’s Common Experience theater piece, Faustus Lights the Lights.  

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 1 - Carlos Castro

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 2 - Carlos Castro

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 3 - Carlos Castro

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 4 - Carlos Castro

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 5 - Carlos Castro

Contact

Dr. Iana A. Castro
Department of Marketing
SDSU Fowler College of Business

Office: SSE-3120
p. 619-594-6426
[email protected] 

Personal Webpage
https://business.sdsu.edu/faculty/marketing/icastro 

Iana CastroOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
My teaching philosphy is focused on teaching students about the importance of community-based work and coming up with sustainable solutions to social problems, while providing them with important knowledge and skills necessary in the workplace. Students address real-world problems in our local communities, build knowledge and raise awareness for pressing social issues, and come up with sustainable, impactful solutions. Students who participate are involved in a transformational experience that will foster an appreciation for community needs and will motivate innovative thinking to address them. 

Education and Training
Ph.D. in Business Administration, Marketing - Arizona State University
M.B.A., Purdue University
B.A. in Mass Communications: Advertising and Public Relations, University of Central Florida

Service Learning Courses Taught
GEN S 480: Engaged Citizenship and Social Responsibility This course examines the process of developing and pursuing suitable solutions to economic, social, and environmental problems through business activity. Drawing upon best practices in the business, government, and non-profit sectors, we will explore how to create positive impact for a community and society while ensuring the long-term sustainability of the proposed solution. The focus of the course will be on developing an understanding of the issues and challenges associated with food systems, food access, food insecurity and food waste, and working on solutions to address these challenges.

Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
N/A

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
N/A

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
Co-Founder and Director of BrightSide Produce (brightside.sdsu.edu), Voting Member of the San Diego Food Systems Alliance

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Faculty Fellows Service Learning Activity - Iana Castro
  

Pedagogical Approach of SL
Women’s Studies as a discipline highly values linking scholarship with community activism.
The field developed in the late 1960s/early 70s when the Second Wave Women’s Movement
brought a critique of gender relations and a demand for scholarship that centered diverse
women’s lives and epistemology. At SDSU we believe that academic knowledge is most
meaningful when supplemented with community involvement that works to materially improve the lives of girls, women and female-identified people.

Through my year-long survey course in American Women’s History (pre-colonization to the
present) students can self-select for one of four community/campus-based service learning
internships. In total, this involves approximately 70 General Education students per semester
enrolled in the classes. These include: The Young Women’s Studies Club at Herbert Hoover
High School in San Diego where weekly 16 SDSU undergraduate and graduate students mentor 60 Hoover students in discussions, creative activities, film analysis and panels around issues that aim to create a most just feminist, race-conscious and social class aware world. The second placement is with the Women’s Museum of California (San Diego) where students work to create traveling exhibits, organize and stage the annual San Diego Country Women’s Hall of Fame event, and offer regular speakers and in-house exhibits. Two on-campus SL opportunities are also possible. The first is placements with [email protected], an LGBTQ+ social justice and ally training program that works to make the SDSU campus proactive, welcoming, knowledgeable and safe for all LGBTQ+ students, faculty, staff and administrators. The final placement is the Womyn’s Outreach Association-a student-led intersectional feminist activist group that offers discussions, events, speakers and consciousness-raising programming.

Within the upper-division General Education class students learn about the historical context of women’s lives: how race, ethnicity, social class, place, age, physical ability, sexual orientation and gender identity, religion, marital status, life expectancy and economics inform diverse women’s lives. Intersectionality is the governing lens. We consider all aspects of someone’s multiple identities and how these create unique life circumstance, privileges. oppressions and ways of knowing. This lens is brought to all the SL placements as well.

Students commit to a thirty-hour workload, twenty of which are on site conceptualizing events with site volunteer organizers and planning and staging these events. Students keep intellectual journals in which they respond to professor-given prompts that tie their course work into their SL work. These journals, along with their end-of-semester Reflection papers that require them to evaluate their own efforts, insights gained and interwoven connections with course material help determine their final course grade. They are exonerated from writing a final annotated bibliography, but are required to plan and present an in-class oral presentation that articulately portrays the main elements of their SL internship, their instrumentality in it and its relevance to the course material.

The journals, Reflections papers and journal entries serve as assessment tools for the professor and graduate assistant who each semester adjust and hone the mechanics of the placements. High school students with the YWSC fill out assessment intake surveys and end-of-semester surveys that evaluate the relevance, impact and value of the programming to them. 

Education and Training
Ph.D. Brown University. American Civilization: American Women’s History, Africana U.S. and
Latin American Race Relations, History of Medicine and Medical Sociology, American Urban
History, American Literature.

MA, Brown University. American Civilization.

MA Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY. Women’s History, History of Medicine, Race
Relations.

University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Women’s Studies, Honors, African-American Studies, History.

Georgetown University Institute of Bioethics.

Service-Learning Courses Taught
WMNST341A American Women’s History, pre-colonization-1870

WMNST341B American Women’s History, 1870-present

WMNST360 Women, Sexuality and the Body

WMSNT565 Women, Health and Healing

WMNST606 Narrating Lives

WMNST608 Body Politics

Publications and Presentations related to SL
Cayleff, Susan; Herron, Melissann; Cormier, Chelsea; Wheeler, Sarah; Chávez-Arteaga, Alicia;
Spain, Jessica; Dominguez, Cristina. “Oral History and ‘Girls’ Voices: The Young Women’s
Studies Club as a Site of Empowerment,” Journal of International Women’s Studies vol.12 no. 4 (Summer 2011): 22-44.

“Women Who Dare: Shaping the Americas, Through Challenge & Action, San Diego, CA: The
Women’s History Museum and Educational Center and the California Council for the
Humanities,” 2008. Published Curated Museum Exhibit.

Cayleff, Susan E. and Groterria, Angela. “Putting Gender and Multi-Cultural Competence at the Center: The Young Women’s Studies Club at Hoover High School; a Community-Based Service Learning Collaborative Project with an SDSU Undergraduate Class in Women’s Studies.” In Gender, Equity and Violence: Multidisciplinary Perspectives through Service Learning, ed. Geraldine Stahly, Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, 2007; 121-138.

Susan E. Cayleff, Hobson, Roberta A. and Schmitz, Roberta J. “Breaking Into Print: Strategies
for Publishing in Women’s Studies as a Grad Student.” In The Grad Students Guide for Being
Published. Eds. Alida Allison and Terri Frongia. New York: Prentice Hall, 1992. 57, 63-69.

Manuals: (Used in Community-Based Service Learning Cultural Competency Trainings
Cayleff, Susan E. The Young Women’s Studies Club at Herbert Hoover High School: A Cultural Competency Training Manual, 2007 onward. With the assistance of Graduate Coordinators over the years.

Cayleff, Susan E. [email protected]: A Cultural Competency Training Manual, 2007 onward.
With the assistance of Graduate Coordinators over the years

Conference and community papers related to SL
2016. Feminist Research Justice Symposium, “Assessment Tool for SafeZones101,” Department of Women’s Studies, San Diego State University, May 2016.

“How to be an Activist,” Jewish Teen Girls’ Leadership Council, Jewish Family Services, San
Diego, Ca. November 5, 2016.

“The Young Women’s Studies Club at Hoover High School, San Diego, California,” Girls’
Issues Feminist Research Justice Symposium, February 27, 2015, San Diego State University.

“The Young Women’s Studies Club at Hoover High School, San Diego, CA.: A Site of
Empowerment and Resistance; The Girls’ Voices Project,” Re-Imagining Girlhood:

Communities, Identities, Self-Portrayals Conference in Cortland, NY. at SUNY Cortland,
October 22, 2010.

“Young Feminist’s Identities and Social Change: Mentoring the Young Women’s Studies Club
for Girls ‘Coming of Age,” Southwest Texas Popular and American Culture Association
Conference, Albuquerque, NM, 2008.

Moderator, “Women’s History in the Community: Triumphs and Challenges at The Women’s
History Museum, San Diego.” Western Association of Women Historians University of San
Diego. May 4-6, 2007.

Organizer of panel, “Women’s Studies in the Community: Making a Difference in Local
Activism,” Feminist Research Colloquium: Feminist Crossroads; Bearing Witness and building
Social Change, The Bread and Roses Center of the Department of Women’s Studies, November
18, 2009.

AWARDS related to SL
2017 Ashley L. Walker Social Justice Award by the Human Relations Commission of
the City of San Diego. The award recognizes individuals who believe in and have
taken action toward the equality and humane treatment of every member of our
community and whose good works have had a significant impact in the growth of
respect, inclusion, and civic engagement of all groups.

2003 San Diego State University Senate Excellence in Teaching Award. Selected by
the Faculty Honors and Awards Committee. One faculty so honored per year from
among a faculty of 900-plus.

2001 Dean Carole Robisciotti Outstanding Faculty Community Service Learning
Award, Aztec Achievement Awards, SDSU. Nominated by the Women’s
Resource Center, The Graduate Women Scholars of Southern California and the
Women’s Studies Student Association.

Grants Related to SL:
2016 College of Arts and Letters Micro-grant, Archiving Young Women’s Studies Club Documents, 1995-2016.

2015. Feminist Research Justice Symposium, “Assessment Tool for the Young
Women’s Club at Hoover High School, Dept. of Women’s Studies, SDSU.
2007 Presidential Leadership Fund, Service Learning Project Between the Young
Women’ Studies Club at Hoover High School and General Education/Honors
Classes in Women’s Studies at San Diego State University: A Five-Year Plan.

2000-01 City Heights Educational Pilot Grant, “A Collaboration between Women’s
Studies 341B, ‘Women in American History, 1890-present,’ and Students at
Hoover High School,” a community service learning project.

2000-01 Women’s History Educational Pilot Grant for Collaborative work between
WS341 B, “Women in American History, 1890-present,” students and the
Women’s History Reclamation Project for SDSU students to create traveling
exhibits, for K-12 public schools.

2001 SDSU Center for Community Based Service Learning Grant, for curricula
collaboration with Hoover High School on, “Shared Women’s Studies Curriculum
between Hoover High School Seniors and SDSU Students: Eight Historical
Novels as a Window into Women’s Diverse Lives, 1792-1975.”

Why I teach SL classes:

I believe that, where possible, connecting students to first hand experiences of the sociological issues they are studying is a crucial component of their learning. Real world connections not only give students a more complex and nuanced comprehension of social problems, but elicit feelings of interest and empathy on a much deeper level than is possible in the classroom context. While in larger classes I bring in community leaders to speak with students, in all classes of 30 or under I send students out into the community.  In these classes I incorporate Service Learning and/or Community-Based Research projects as major components to further this goal of enriched and lasting comprehension.

Besides enhancing subject matter understanding, I believe that service learning also builds students’ skills.  Students become more comfortable with and adept at specific tasks that translate into preparation for many future endeavors.  For example, when students in my classes do intakes for a local employee rights group or surveys on wage theft they learn how to approach strangers, elicit information, listen closely, focus the client/informant back to the needed the information, etc.  These skills are helpful for students going into any job but particularly research, customer service, and non-profit work. My students who tutor refugees and those who create and teach new curriculum on labor rights learn how to break down complex information, how to engage students, and how to manage classrooms or study sessions.  These skills obviously help students going into K-12 teaching or graduate school where they will work as TAs, but again help with any job where students will train others, present material, etc.

Finally, and most importantly, I believe that students build their civic capacities through community engagement.  I use a civic-capacities building rubric that students must reflect on in their journaling in my SL classes. These capacities go beyond the specific topic of the course or particular hard skills. Students are asked to reflect on their development of open-mindedness, community building, leadership, working collectively, and many other important characteristics. I believe that it is these capacities that may have the largest lifelong impact on improving the lives of our students and our world.

Education:

    • Ph.D. University of California at Berkeley, Comparative Ethnic Studies, May 2001. Dissertation: The Social Accountability Contract: Private Monitoring and Labor Relations in the Global Apparel Industry.  
    • M.A. University of California at Berkeley, Comparative Ethnic Studies, 1995, with distinction.
    • B. A. Brown University, American Civilization, 1986, with honors, Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa. Honors thesis: Chicana Feminism: Women in the Farah Strike, UFW and Chicano Student Movement.  

SL Courses Taught

      • Soc 480: Internship (as supervision to individual students)
      • Soc 531: Working and Society
      • Soc 555: Immigrants and Refugees in US Society
      • Soc 740: Sociology of Immigration
      • Soc 796: Field Practicum (Community-Based)
      • Honors 413: Lived Experience of Immigrants and Refugees
      • GenSt 480: Engaged Citizenship and Social Responsibility

Community Service Learning activities in my classes (as of 2018) include:

  • 6 semesters of incorporating internships into honors course (HON 413) on immigration
  • 6 semesters of organizing joint field trips with 40-70 SDSU and refugee high school students (HON 413)
  • 6 semesters of incorporating internships into sociology courses on immigration (SOC 555)
  • 1 semester of incorporating community service learning collaborative projects with local NGO in Work and Society (SOC 531)
  • Individual internships and practicums through our independent studies (16 in last 3 years)
  • 7 semesters of community-based research field practicums collaborating with local NGOs (SOC 796)
  • 4 semester of Engaged Citizenship and Social Responsibility (GS 480) in which students spend 5 hours a week in various community service learning activities (conducting Employee Rights Center intakes, phone banking, attending community-worker protests, advocating for worker rights on campus, teaching high school students), research and curriculum development
  • Field trip for over 100 King-Chavez high school students to SDSU for tour and presentation led and organized by my students

Publications with students participating in Community-Based Research:

Peer Reviewed Articles:

Esbenshade, Jill, Elizabeta Shifrin and Karina Ryder, “Leveraging Liminality: How San Diego Taxi Drivers Used their Precarious Status to Win Reform, “Labor History, forthcoming March 4, 2019.

Esbenshade, Jill and Elizabeta Shifrin, “The Leased Among Us: Precarious Work, Local Regulation, and the Taxi Industry” Labor Studies, first published April 12, 2018.

Esbenshade, Jill, Matthew Vidal, Gina Fascilla and Mariko Ono. 2016. “Customer Driven Management Models for Choiceless Clientele: Business Process Reengineering in a California Welfare Agency,” Work, Employment and Society, 30(1): 77-96.

Esbenshade, Jill and Barbara Obrzut. 2007-2008. "Local Immigration Regulation: A Problematic Trend in Public Policy," Harvard Journal of Hispanic Policy, (20), 33-47.

Esbenshade, Jill with Erica Morgan, Micah Mitroky, Marilisa Navarro, Matt Rotondi, and Cynthia Vasquez.  2006. “Pain, Profits and Pillows: Hotels and Housekeepers in San Diego,” WorkingUSA: The Journal of Labor and Society, 9: 265-292. (Lead article).

Policy Reports

Jill Esbenshade, Peter Brownell, Alor Calderon, Susan Duerksen, Amanda Hendrix, Elizabeta Shifrin, Christopher Conner, Charlene Eivaz, Raquel Funches, Susan Gates, Kelly Gmeiner, Ian Larson, Leandra Lococo, Amina Mohamed, Thuan Nguyen, Lauren Pon, Arely Sanchez, Alicia Salinas, and Brady Stanton. “Confronting Wage Theft: Barriers to Claiming Unpaid Wages in San Diego.” San Diego State University Department of Sociology and Center on Policy Initiatives. https://www.cpisandiego.org/reports/confrontingwagetheft/

Esbenshade, Jill (PI) and Peter Brownell, Susan Duerksen, Matt Phutisatayakul, Juan Flores, Kat Durant, Sonia Rodriguez, Lisa Riccardi, Charlene Holkenbrink-Monk, Amy Ash, Natalia Beshquoy, April Brenner, Maria Caballero, Phillipp Dembicki, Jackson Faber, Thomas Haberer, Lucas Lacerda, Mayra Lopez, Jennifer Renner, Jarrett Rose, and Brianna Lundgren. 2015.  Shorted: Wage Theft, Time Theft, and Discrimination in San Diego County Restaurants Jobs.  San Diego State University Department of Sociology and Center on Policy Initiatives. Available at: http://www.cpisandiego.org/shorted_media

Distribution and Impact: Distributed 1200 hard copies (plus over 250 online downloads and unknown shares); distributed 7,000 English and 800 Spanish copies of pamphlet summarizing Know-Your-Rights information from report; and an unknown number of 2-page summary of report.  Presented report to California Labor Commissioner Julie Su and California State Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, and City Councilmember Todd Gloria, as well as 100’s of community members in various presentations. The report was also cited by California Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León in op-ed successfully advocating for a state bill to strengthen government’s ability to collect on wage theft judgments.  Report widely covered by local English and Spanish language media.

Esbenshade, Jill (PI) and Muna Aden, Andy Anderson, Amy Ash, Linzi Berkowitz, Roberto Danipour, Lea Marzo, Janelle Perez, Andrew Quinn, Rebecca Quinn, Karina Russ, Helga Staalhane, and Carolina Valdivia, with Susan Duerksen and Peter Brownell. 2013.  Driven to Despair: A Survey of San Diego Taxi Drivers.  San Diego State University Department of Sociology and Center on Policy Initiatives. Available at: http://onlinecpi.org/reports/driven-to-despair/

Distribution and Impact: Distributed 1200 hard copies (plus unknown number of online downloads and shares).  Invited to join Mayor’s Taxi Advisory Committee as only academic expert. Full report presentation to City Council Committee on Public Safety and Neighborhood Services and to individual council members. City Attorney Jan Goldsmith distributed report to all members of Union-Tribune editorial board, which took a position supporting reform. Testified to full city council in hearings, which resulted in successful reform of the industry. Report widely covered by both English and Spanish language media.

Contact

Dr. Sarah Garrity
Department of Child & Family Development
SDSU College of Education

Office: EBA 403A
p. 619-594-0514 
[email protected] 

Personal Webpage
https://education.sdsu.edu/directory/cfd/sarah-garrity 

Sarah GarrityOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
My pedagogical approach to service learning is informed by my time as a practitioner in the field of early care and education (ECE) as a Head Start teacher, administrator, literacy coach, and consultant. I am deeply committed to exploring evidence-based practices that can improve the quality of the ECE workforce and view service learning as a way to bridge theory to practice and enhance student learning while providing a valuable service to the community. As Chair of the Department of Child and Family Development, I am fortunate to work with faculty who are committed to service learning, and a goal of the department is to prepare students with hands-on experiences through community-based learning. The department currently has over 160 Service Learning Agreements in place at both the undergraduate and graduate level. I am very excited to have been selected as a Service Learning Faculty Fellow and look forward to learning more about pedagogical strategies related to service learning and sharing my experiences, as well as those of the CFD faculty, with others. 

Education and Training
2011 University of California, San Diego / CSU San Marcos, Ed.D. Educational Leadership 
1998 San Diego State University, M.S. Child and Family Development
1989 University of Pittsburgh Bachelor of Arts English Literature and Economics

Service Learning Courses Taught
CFD 380: Language and Literacy in a Diverse Society
This course addresses language and literacy development in early childhood, with a focus on an emergent, intentional approach to curriculum and the social-emotional components of early literacy. Guidelines from the California Department of Education are used to reflect developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive practices that have been shown to result in improved language, literacy, and school readiness outcomes. Special attention is paid to meeting the needs of dual language learners and developing and implementing instruction that is individualized and builds on children’s prior knowledge and the strengths and resources of families and communities. In addition, the service learning component of the class focuses on bridging theory and practice, as students work with a child throughout the semester, providing the opportunity to implement and reflect on concepts and strategies learned throughout the class.

Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
Ritblatt, S.N., Garrity, S., Longstreth, S., Hokoda, A., & Potter, N. (2013). Early care and education matters: A conceptual model for early childhood teacher preparation integrating the key constructs of knowledge, reflection, and practice, Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 34 (1), 46-62. 

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
IP Development Grant: Creating International Experiences that involve Serving Learning in International Programs, April, 2017. Award amount: $1,200.

IP Development Grant: Creating International Experiences that involve Serving Learning in International Programs, January, 2014. Award amount: $1,935.

President’s Leadership Award, SDSU Children’s Center Library Project, April, 2012. Award amount: $5,000.

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
Kindergarten Academy, Chollas Meade Elementary School, Summer 2018

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 1 - Sarah Garrity Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 2 - Sarah Garrity Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 3 - Sarah Garrity

Contact

Dr. Brian T. Hentschel
Department of Biology
SDSU College of Sciences

Office: PS 147
p. 619-594-0358 
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/pub/hentschel/hentschel.html 

Headshot of Brian HentschelOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
I firmly believe that most learning is only possible through active experiences, including the application of knowledge to solve real-world problems and communicating knowledge to others. As a scholar and teacher in the disciplines of marine ecology and biological oceanography, I also strive to provide students with opportunities to develop into young marine scientists who practice the process of scientific research. Many opportunities exist in San Diego for my students to enhance their learning by applying their knowledge and research activities to local environmental issues. Furthermore, because many K-12 students have limited exposure to the process of ecological or oceanographic research, opportunities also exist for my SDSU students to further their learning by serving as research role models and mentors for younger students. 

Education and Training
1995, University of Washington, Biological Oceanography, Ph.D.

Service Learning Courses Taught
Biol 516B “Marine Larval Ecology Research Experience Part 2”

Publications and Presentations related to Services Learning
2006-2018: Larval Ecology And Research Networking (LEARN) visits to 4 local High School classrooms by students enrolled in Biol 516A & 516B to demonstrate sea urchin spawning and discuss 516B research projects

2002-2004: Organized and led an annual rocky-intertidal field trip for a Cub Scout Troop (student volunteers from Biol 515 “Marine Invertebrate Biology” also participated as Guides)

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
SEAWaRD: Stewardship, Education, and Advocacy through Wetlands Research Data PI: D. Ross, co-PIs: B. Hentschel and M Grant (CSUF) CSU-COAST Collaborative Incentive Award Program-Fall 2009 semester. 2 wtu release. 

CAREER: Consequences of short-term food variability during the development of marine invertebrate larvae. PI: B.T. Hentschel. $503,415 from NSF Biological Oceanography OCE-0548190. Award Period: 04/01/06 – 3/31/11.

South Bay Power Plant Impingement Study. co-PIs: T. Anderson, B. Hentschel, K. Hovel, M. Edwards (all SDSU). $42,575 from Tenera Environmental. Award Period: 12/15/02 - 12/31/03. This contract was set up to allow SDSU graduate and undergraduates to participate in the invertebrate sampling at the power plant.

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
2017-present: SDSU SL Faculty Fellow

2017: Research seminar presentation to two natural science classes from Valley Center High School. “Hydrodynamic mediation of killifish predation on infaunal polychaetes.” 25 April 2017.

2015: Led a rocky intertidal field trip for four classes of 24 1st and 2nd graders from the San Diego Cooperative Charter School. 25 February 2015.

2013- 2015: Regional Partner and Mentor for K-2 teachers from Lakeside, CA as part of the IDEAS 2.0 Project.

2014: SDSU Coastal & Marine Institute Laboratory (CMIL) Annual Open House. Research presentation. “How do Tidal currents affect food webs in salt marshes?” 10 March 2014.

2014: Research seminar presentation at SDSU Coastal & Marine Institute Laboratory (CMIL) to 36 students from San Diego’s High Tech High. “Hydrodynamic mediation of killifish predation on infaunal polychaetes. 10 January 2014.

2012-2015: Assisted with the set-up and maintenance of an aquarium displaying local marine invertebrates at the SDSU Children’s Center.

2013: Led a rocky intertidal field trip for a group of 10 students from the San Diego Cooperative Charter School. 15 December 2013.

2010-2013: Annual visit by SDSU Children’s Center Pre-School class to Marine Invertebrate Biology Classroom

2012: Led a rocky intertidal field trip for the SDSU Children’s Center’s Outdoor Group. 18 February 2012

2010: Mentor for Student Intern from High Tech High, Brielle Rainney

2009: Summer Research Mentor for a Teacher from Patrick Henry High School, William Miller

2008: Mentor for Student Interns from High Tech High, Jennifer Zarzoso, David Dominguez-Gadson, Anthony Wong

2007: Mentor for Student Intern from High Tech High, Jennifer Zarzoso 

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 1 - Brian Hentschel

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 2 - Brian Hentschel

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 3 - Brian Hentschel

Contact

Dr. Young-Shin Lee
School of Nursing
SDSU College of Health & Human Services

Office: AH 3150
p. 619-594-5385
[email protected]

Headshot of Young-Shin LeeOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
Goals of my pedagogical approaches are to develop students’ potential ability in evidence- based practice through scientific approaches, and improve the community’s priority health issues with responsibility and visible outcomes by students’ work. These approaches include four steps: 1) Integrate prior learning - add current knowledge and skills to new knowledge. Since students often face challenges in reiterating and combining their prior learning, this approach helps them reinforce their knowledge. 2) Develop strategies to prevent health risks as a top priority of a target population in the community. The health topics are chosen from community-based needs within a scope of student capability, innovative learning processes including population assessment, intervention, evaluation of scientific approach and bridging the national agenda of priority health issues. 3) Serve the target population through outcome- oriented goals: The developed strategies are specific to the target population with expected outcomes. 4) Lastly, measurement and dissemination of the outcomes of the intervention. Through these approaches, I believe, students have an opportunity to experience the problem-solving process, build a network with community organization and population, and assess the research process while understanding the importance of population-focused education and strategies in the community. 

Education and Training
2003 University of Texas, Austin – PhD, Nursing/Gerontology 
1993 Seoul National University – M.S, Nursing
1981 Seoul National University – B.S, Nursing

Service Learning Courses Taught
NURS 415L: Community Health Nursing
This clinical course is designed to conduct service learning activities with 30-40 hours per semester in diverse places and populations in our community. Students visit K-8 schools, blended high schools, and senior housing places; provide prevention strategies with common health concerns such as oral health and nutrition, e-cigarettes, and emergency preparedness, which are essentials of Healthy People 2020; and present the results of projects in the organizations and classroom. 

NURS 410: Gerontological Nursing
Based on the service learning concept, the course was regularly offered as part of a Community Health Fair as groups functioning in senior centers, churches and other San Diego County health fair sites. The topics were varied based on the needs of the community and its members. These included fall and fracture risk assessment, increased public awareness of high blood pressure, depression, and other topics essential to older adults. Through this process of community service work, students can increase their communication skills as well as empirical experiences for what comprises common issues in older adults.


Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
Nov. 2018 “Advanced Learning from A Community Based Health Service” Y-S Lee, C. Galang, & J.E. Hughen. Poster presentation at the 146rd American Public Health Association, San Diego, CA.

Mar. 2018 “Evaluating Oral Health and Nutrition in Second Grade Classrooms” C. Lutz, G. Moran, P. Ross, S. Tran, & Y-S Lee. 2018 Students Research Symposium, San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Mar. 2016 “Bone health and Calcium Supplement Intake among Adults Living in San Diego County”, E. Aguirre, J. Gao, M. Zhang, & Y-S Lee. Mentoring student’s research and dissemination at 1) the 49th WIN Conference, Anaheim, CA and 2) 2016 Students Research Symposium (SRS), San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Mar. 2013 Mentoring student’s research and dissemination at (1) the 46th WIN Conference, Anaheim, CA. and (2) 2013 Students Research Symposium, San Diego State University, San Diego, California “Nutritional Health Status of Homeless Veterans in San Diego”: J. Arguelles, M. Cruz, C. Garcia, G. Han, & Y-S Lee.

“Awareness and Treatment Related to Blood Pressure in San Diego Community” K. Padiernos, J. Salas, S. Bongato, C. Dela Cruz, & Y-S Lee

“Bone Health and Acculturation of Korean-American Women” H. Seo, Y. Kim, & Y-S Lee

“10 year Fracture Risk and Related Preventive Behavior in the Independent Living”, J. Acosta, E. Aazmi, R. Ruezga, D. Koren, & Y-S

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
2017 Funding for N415 Community Health Nursing, Service Learning projects from Undergraduate Studies, SDSU, 2017 Spring and Fall

2015-16 Recipient of “Assigned Time for Exceptional Levels of Service to Students” from San Diego State University, 2015 - 2016

2015 Mini-grant for Undergraduate student research presentation, Undergraduate Studies, SDSU

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
2017 - Present Korean-American Dementia Caregiver Support Group: Founder and facilitator of the group.

2016 Training UG students for research and guiding presentation in a professional peer reviewed regional conference and SDSU SRS Student’s research

2009 - Present Judge, SDSU Students Research Symposium (SRS)

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 1 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 2 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 3 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 4 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 5 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 6 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 6 - Young-Shin Lee

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 7 - Young-Shin Lee

Contact

Dr. Alan Mobley
School of Public Affairs
SDSU College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

Office: AH 4123
p. 619-594-2596
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
https://spa.sdsu.edu/research/institute/project-rebound

Headshot of Alan MobleyOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
As a Criminal Justice professor, I have the privilege of preparing students for careers of public safety leadership, scholarship, and service. Over the past 15 years, I have found that our remarkably diverse students are, above all, united by a commitment to service. It is in honoring this service ethic that I find my most profound motivation as a teacher and researcher, and in my own service. The overall focus of my work is rooted in understanding and improving relationships and community quality of life, especially in the case of disadvantaged communities with enduring relationships with the criminal justice system.

The core philosophy of my teaching is to equip students (incarcerated and not), local residents, and professionals to successfully participate as leaders in uncertain, always emerging futures. By necessity, this approach is student/person-centered. I care what students and residents think, invite them to consider and express their opinions, and through a process of reflection and dialogue to develop their own critical visions of their lives, professions, society, and future possibilities. This transformative methodology informs me of how participants think (and often the reasons why they think as they do), and also begins the process whereby students and residents expose and examine their own often unexamined assumptions. Sharing thoughts, feelings, and experiences builds a learning community where people feel safe to explore new ideas and relationships.

Education and Training
Ph.D. Criminology, Law & Society (2001), School of Social Ecology University of California, Irvine 
M.A. Sociology (1994), The Graduate Program Vermont College of Norwich University
B.S. Economics (1991. Minor: Spanish.), Regents College State University of New York
Carrier of Council (2007), Ojai Foundation, Ojai CA

Service Learning Courses Taught
CJ 543: Community Resources in Criminal Justice
The course fulfills the required practicum component of our undergraduate curriculum. It emphasizes service learning in a disadvantaged community, and considers the possibilities of social justice as a means toward crime prevention. Our students tutor, mentor, and guide at-risk youth, and otherwise bring much needed capacity to struggling schools and community organizations. Parents, teachers, and administrators frequently voice their gratitude. Class participants have earned honors and awards, landed jobs and recommendations, and have refined their intellectual and career ambitions.

CJ 431: Field Study in Local Corrections
The course fulfills the required practicum component of our undergraduate curriculum. Students learn about the "real world" of mass incarceration by visiting several local detention facilities and community-based transition homes for people returning from prison. Collaborative learning activities include "inside" and "outside" students studying issues of local importance, and developing written products of use to local residents.

Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
Mobley, Alan. “The Convict Code and Participatory Prison Reform.” Critical Issues in Crime and Justice, 3rd Edition. Okada, D., Maguire, M., and Sardina, A., Eds. Thousand Oaks, CA. Sage Publishing. 2018

Mobley, Alan. “Prison Reentry as a Rehabilitative Rite of Passage for the Formerly Incarcerated.” Contemporary Justice Review. 2014.

Mobley, Alan. “Seeing” Shame: Legal Storytelling, and Prisoner Rehabilitation.” Journal of Prisoners on Prisons, 23(1), 2014.

Mobley, Alan. “Nothing Personal: Mass Incarceration, Prisoner Reentry, and Disillusionment.” Eurovista: Probation and Community Justice. 3(1). 2013

Mobley, Alan. "Hands in the Clay: Mentoring, Students, and Criminological Reformation.” Western Criminology Review 14(1). 2013

Mobley, Alan. “Garbage In, Garbage Out? The Convict Code and Participatory Prison Reform.” Critical Issues of Crime and Justice: Thought, Policy and Practice. Mary Maguire, ed. Sage. 2010.

Mobley, Alan. “Convict Criminology: Narrative and the Authority of Experience.” Critical Voices in Criminology. Chris Powell, ed. Lexington Press. 2009.

Mobley, Alan. "Just Business: Partnering for Sustainable Justice," Reflections: The Journal of the Society for Organizational Learning. 8(2), 2007 (July).

2019
“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting. San Francisco, CA. November 17.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” RJ Donovan State Prison. Otay Mesa, CA. October 22.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” Mule Creek State Prison. Ione, CA. August 4.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” High Desert State Prison. Susanville, CA. July 16.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” Annual Meeting, European Forum on Restorative Justice. Bilbao, Spain. June 4.

“Erasing Stigma: The Future of Convict Criminology.” School of Critical Criminology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. June 1.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” Trauma and Memory Conference. University of Turku, Turku, Finland. May 25.

2018
“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting. Atlanta, GA. November 13.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” RJ Donovan State Prison. Otay Mesa, CA. October 1.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” Mule Creek State Prison. Ione, CA. August 10.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” High Desert State Prison. Susanville, CA. April 2.

“Project Rebound/Inmate Council Project.” Western Society of Criminology Annual Meeting. Honolulu, HI. February 15

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
Teaching Awards
Most Influential Criminal Justice Faculty Award, 2017 School of Public Affairs Award Ceremony, San Diego State University

Most Influential Criminal Justice Faculty Award, 2009 School of Public Affairs Award Ceremony, San Diego State University

Most Influential Criminal Justice Faculty Award (co-recipient), 2007 School of Public Affairs Award, Ceremony San Diego State University

Service Awards
2017-2018 University Exceptional Service Award, San Diego State University

2016-2017 University Exceptional Service Award, San Diego State University

2009-2010 Director’s Special Recognition Award for Faculty Contributions to Collaborative Community Relations, School of Public Affairs, San Diego State University

2008-2009 Director’s Special Recognition Award for Faculty Contributions to Collaborative Community Relations, School of Public Affairs, San Diego State University

2007-2008 Director’s Special Recognition Award for Faculty Contributions to Collaborative Community Relations, School of Public Affairs, San Diego State University

Service Grants
2019-2020 Project Rebound: A Support Program for Formerly Incarcerated Students CSU Office of the Chancellor ($260,000)

2016-2018 Project Rebound: A Support Program for Formerly Incarcerated Students Opportunity Institute ($225,000)

2016-2017 Project Rebound: A Support Program for Formerly Incarcerated Students Sycuan Foundation ($25,000)

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
Co-Founder: CSU Project Rebound Consortium (2019)

Co-Founder: SDSU Project Rebound (2016)

Co-Founder: Inmate Council Project, Center for Council, Calif Dept of Corrections & Rehabilitation (2012)

Co-Founder: All Of Us Or None, Civil Rights Advocates for formerly incarcerated People (2002)

Co-Founder: Convict Criminology, American Society of Criminology (2000)

Member, Minority Scholarship Committee. American Society of Criminology. (2009-2010)

Member, Advisory Board, Contribute, a nonprofit organization using communicative strategies to serve children with incarcerated parents. (2008-2015)

Member, Advisory Board, Criminals and Gang Members Anonymous, a nonprofit organization utilizing the 12 Steps to break the cycle of gangs, crime, and prison. Founded and operated by current and former California prisoners. (2002-2009)

Past President & Member, Advisory Board, Visions for Prisons. VFP is dedicated to working with corrections staff and clients to develop asset-based thinking within a framework of community. (1996-2012) 

Service Learning Couse Activities Photos
Faculty Fellows Poster - Alan Mobley

Overview of Pedagogical Approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching
Philosophy) 
I am committed to service learning as a systematic instructional approach through which
students gain real-world experience as well as academic training as an integrated part of their education. Service learning is one model of experiential learning that occurs when students are supported in applying their knowledge and conceptual understanding to real-world community-based problems or authentic situations. As an instructor of service learning, I guide and facilitate student learning in the TE362 course (Fieldwork in Community Settings). The goals for this course require activities that exemplify the five stages of service learning as stated by Kay Berger: Investigation, Preparation, Action, Reflection, and Demonstration. Service learning requires a relatively long-term commitment to a community service which reaps reciprocal benefits for both the students and the community agency or institution where they are placed. Goals of service learning should include building understanding and perspective of community-based issues and how other people live, increasing self-awareness, assisting students develop their future plans, and supporting students appreciate their varied talents and interests based on the theory of multiple intelligences.

Education and Training
1966: George Washington University - B. A., Psychology/Economics
1972: University of Kansas - M. A., Linguistics, Child Language Acquisition
1981: University of Kansas - Ph. D., Educational Psychology and Research

Service Learning Courses Taught
Fieldwork in Community Settings (TE 362), San Diego State University Fall 2000 – Present.

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the
Profession)
The TE362 service-learning course I teach aims to make a difference in students’ professional options by giving them the opportunity to positively influence the lives of children, families, and communities as they help teachers provide children with individualized learning experiences.

Students work collaboratively with teachers to tutor elementary, middle and high school
students attending underserved schools in reading, math and science. Students may participate for TE 362 credit for two semesters and may also volunteer for the opportunity if not work-study eligible.

Students’ academic preparation follows Kay’s five stages of service learning. They include an
inventory of student interest, skills, and talents, and the social analysis of the issue being
addressed. This analysis requires gathering information about the identified need through
action research including use of varied approaches: media, interviews of experts, survey of
varied populations, and direct observation/personal experiences (Investigation). Continued
acquisition of knowledge that addresses any questions that arise from the investigation;
academic content; identification of groups already working towards solutions; organization of a plan with clarification of roles, responsibilities and timelines; and ongoing development of any skills needed to carry the plan successfully to fruition (Preparation). The implementation of the plan that may take the form of a combination or any one of the following: direct service, indirect service, advocacy, or research (Action). Consideration of how students’ thoughts and feelings regarding any overarching essential question or inquiry that is a driving force of the total experience (Reflection). A demonstration to a specific audience of what the service-learning experience entailed, what students have learned, and the local and national problems in public education they have discovered (Demonstration).
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Awards and Grants Related to Service Learning
Present Grants:
• America Counts: A work-study opportunity for students to tutor mathematics in
underserved middle and high schools
• America Reads: A work-study opportunity for students to tutor reading in underserved
elementary schools grades k-3
• Educational Talent Search
Department of Education, Award No. PO44A160785 9/1/16 – 8/31/21
Annual Award $487,680.00
• Talent Search Mentoring: Meaningful Mentoring to Build a College-Going Culture
Department of Education, Award No. P044A160881 9/1/16 – 8/31/21
Annual Award $240,000.00
Selected Past Grants:
• Gear Up to City Heights 2009 – 2016, Seven-year award $5,467,206
As the principal author of the grant proposal, the programs I direct under the Pre-College
Institute Umbrella collaborated with the City Heights Educational Collaborative to provide
tutor training and in-class tutoring to GEAR UP students through service learning.


Awards Which Included Service Learning as one of the Dimensions of Merit:

August 2012 SDSU Alumni Association Award, (the “Monty Award”) for Outstanding

Faculty Contributions, College of Education Representative.

May 2012 SDSU Presidential Leadership Fund Excellence Award for exemplifying
principles such as, innovation, entrepreneurship, and excellence and for
making significant strides to encourage student success and academic
excellence, and to attract the best and brightest students to SDSU.

September 2010 Council for Opportunity in Education’s Walter O. Mason Award. Established
to honor outstanding educational opportunity professionals who exemplify his sense of leadership and his ideals.

September 2008 Selected as a faculty member of SDSU’s Center for Research in Math & Science

Education.

June 2007 “SDSEA University Level Award.” San Diego Science Educators Association

(SDSEA). For outstanding contributions to K-12 science.

2006 Selected as a member of the National Advisory Board for the Louis Stokes Institute for increasing opportunity in science, technology, and engineering and mathematics education among low-income and underrepresented students.

July 2002 “TRIO Trailblazer Award.” To recognize persons in various fields who are
committed to their specific area of interests as well as the continued educational success of students. Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Reunion of the University of Southern California Upward Bound Program, “Educational Excellence From One Millennium to the next,” USC Los Angeles, CA.
March 1999 “The Steve Holman Award.” This award recognizes the lifetime career
achievements of Directors of TRIO programs from the Western Association of
Equal Opportunity Personnel.

May 1998 “Top 25 Award.” San Diego State University, Presidential Award for Outstanding Contribution to the University.

April 1996 “Unsung Hero” Certificate of Appreciation. San Diego County Commission on Children, Youth, and Families.

Contact

Dr. Rachael Record
School of Communication
SDSU College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

Office: COMM 201
p. 619-594-8512
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
https://communication.sdsu.edu/faculty_and_staff/profile/rachael-record
 

Headshot of Rachael RecordOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
My approach to providing students with service learning opportunities is to give them an opportunity to connect their classroom skills with local organizations about which they feel passionate. Students in my service learning course select local San Diego organizations based on the mission and values they are looking to support. Students complete a set number of volunteer hours and detailed time sheets reflecting on the volunteer experience as it relates to course content. This approach achieves a number of learning and life objectives.

The learning objectives surround recognition of the application of textbook concepts within their community volunteering experience. This includes recognizing the process of community organizing currently going on in the local community, examining the effectiveness of community efforts in achieving specified community health outcomes, and analyzing and demonstrating effective community communication between organizations and publics.

My approach to service learning seeks to provide students an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the community. Students often do not realize the health challenges that persist just beyond the border of campus. The opportunity to give back at food banks, shelters, associations, and events inspires students to realize what their major can contribute in order to better society.

Education and Training
Ph.D., Communication, University of Kentucky 
MA, Communication, University of Kentucky
BA, Communication, SUNY University at Buffalo

Service Learning Courses Taught
COMM 421: Health Communication & Community-based Service Learning
The Health Communication and Community-based Service Learning course is an elective for upper-division health communication majors. This course is designed to equip students with the skills to (a) articulate public health crises including causes, status, and potential solutions, (b) identify community and local non-profit needs/special considerations, (c) apply best practice communication strategies to address public health crises, and (d) effectively work with local community groups to improve health among members of the San Diego community.


Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
Record, R. A. (November, 2019). SPARK Discussion: Engaging service learning students to empower women surviving homelessness. Paper presented at to the National Communication Association, Experiential Learning in Communication Division. Baltimore, MD.

COMM 421 Service Learning Course Video, Fall 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9GXG-h62bk&t=7s 

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
2017 Summer Undergraduate Research Award to mentor an undergraduate student through a hands-on independent research project. The student designed a research study to improve health communication among a target San Diego group, gathered data, and analyzed the findings.

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
2017-present, Advisory Committee, Fulfilling Destiny (San Diego Non-profit)

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 1 - Rachael Record

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 2 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 3 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 4 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 5 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 6 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 7 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 8 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 9 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 10 - Sarah Garrity

Service Learning Faculty Fellow Activities Photos 11 - Sarah Garrity

Contact

Dr. Matthew W. Savage
School of Communication
SDSU College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

Office: COMM 201
p. 619-594-8512
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
https://communication.sdsu.edu/faculty_and_staff/profile/matthew-savage 

Headshot of Matt SavageOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
Matthew enjoys partnering with nonprofits and NGOs to teach classes in service to the community. His teaching philosophy focuses on participatory engagement, the importance of establishing the relevance of course material to real-world experiences, and challenging students to exceed their expectations while researching and addressing social problems.

Education and Training
2012, Arizona State University, PhD, Communication (Emphases: health communication and biostats)

Service Learning Courses Taught
COMM 421: Health Communication & Community-based Service Learning
Gen S 480: Communication Research Methods in the Field

Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
Savage, M. W. (2020, May). Outcome evaluation of a transnational service learning course: “Communication Research Methods in the Field”. Manuscript under review for presentation at the annual conference of the International Communication Association, Melbourne, Australia. Savage, M. W., Merchant Ley, D., & Juarez Nunez, J. (2019, November). SPARK breakout: Communication Research Methods in the Field, a binational service learning course. Manuscript to be presented at the 105th annual conference of the National Communication Association, Baltimore, MD. Savage, M. W., & Merchant Ley, D. (2019, May). Participatory action research across the San Diego-Tijuana Border. Manuscript presented at the annual conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
Funder: SDSU Center for Teaching and Learning Mini Grant
Project Title: Innovating and Evaluating COMM 499: “Communication Research Methods in the Field”
Project Description: Evaluation of a transnational service learning course in social science research methods taught Spring 2019. Outcomes included students’ perceptions of border issues, endorsement of public health initiatives, and perspective-taking skills.
Amount: $2,000
Awarded: January-May, 2019
Position/Role: PI

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
“Communication Research Methods in the Field,” Invited speaker for Second Annual SDSU Service Learning Best Practices Exhibition, April, 2019. 


Service Learning Course Activities Photos
Matt Savage Service Learning Activity #2 Matt Savage Service Learning Activity #1 Matt Savage Service Learning Activity #3 Matt Savage Service Learning Activity #4 Matt Savage Service Learning Activity #5 Matt Savage Service Learning Activity #6

Contact

Dr. Megan Welsh
School of Public Affairs
SDSU College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts

Office: AH 4234
p. 215-498-2255
[email protected]

Personal Webpage
https://spa.sdsu.edu/fac_staff/spa_profiles/megan-welsh 

Megan WelshOverview of pedagogical approach to Service Learning (Service Learning Teaching Philosophy) 
The heart of my pedagogical approach is that learning happens through experience – basically, that working to investigate and respond to real-world issues helps students to gain both knowledge and skills. Also, my research and teaching centers around vulnerable populations such as people experiencing homelessness and people who have had criminal-legal contact. Because of this focus, my approach to service learning also emphasizes actively listening to people's stories about their lives, their experiences, and their survival strategies, as well as the experiences and expertise of social service providers and advocates who work directly with marginalized or otherwise vulnerable people. 

Education and Training
2015, CUNY Graduate Center and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, PhD in Criminal Justice
2008, Temple University, Master of Social Work; 
2002, UC Berkeley, Bachelor of Social Welfare;

Service Learning Courses Taught
Gen S 480: Engaged Citizenship and Social Responsibility (Fall 2020 and Spring 2021): This course will focus on understanding the lives, experiences, and survival strategies of people experiencing homelessness in San Diego during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will learn basic strategies for ethical social science research in an era of social distancing, and we will work with a community partner (a homelessness service provider) to use our social science methods to conduct research into the needs of the unsheltered homeless population during the pandemic.

Publications and Presentations related to Service Learning
Welsh, M. (2018). “We are humans first”: Expanding learning outcomes in an undergraduate research methods course through an experiential learning project on homelessness. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 29(3), 414-435. 

Awards and grants related to Service Learning
Service Learning Faculty Fellowship, Spring 2020–Spring 2021

Service Activities Related to Service Learning (Community Activities, Service to the Profession)
I served as a member of the planning committee for a three day visit to San Diego by Leilani Farha, United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to housing, August 12-14, 2019. This event was featured in our local press. See, for example: Warth, G. (2019, August 15). “It’s as bad, if not worse, than I anticipated”: UN appointee gets a look at San Diego homelessness. San Diego Union-Tribune:https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/homelessness/story/2019-08-15/un-rapporteur-visits-san-diego-to-learn-about-areas-homeless

In 2018, I worked with the Criminal Justice Student Association (CJSA), the Criminal Justice Honors Society (CJHS), the Graduate Social Work Association (GSWA), and the Guardian Scholars Advisory board to host a film screening of Tony-the Movie, a documentary on homelessness in San Diego, at the SDSU Student Union theater. You can watch the film here: https://tony-themovie.com/

Service Learning Course Activities Photos

Megan Welsh's students conducting service learning Megan Welsh's students conducting service learning activities